What qualities do you want to see and NOT WANT to see in TruStory community members?


#1

In general, my motto is “Criticism, memes, and rigorous debate are encouraged. No assholes.”

I actually have list of qualities that I like to see in people I work with. I see no difference why I wouldn’t want that in community members. But the biggest thing I would say is I want to see people who are involved in this for the right reasons. I want to see people who are driven by intrinsic motivations such as:

  • you find misinformation troublesome, and understand how it fractures society
  • You find crypto and blockchain technology breathtaking, and you want to be part of it
  • you understand the impact of the internet, and you want to see trust built into it

These aren’t the only intrinsic motivations. There’s a million but I want people who are driven by intrinsic motivations to be involved with TruStory.


#2

TruStory claims the following:

  1. they claim to value: ethical, curious and passionate people who are motivated by crypto and blockchain for intrinsic reasons, not price speculation
  2. they would rather not tolerate: laziness, entitlement, assholery, etc

Source: Email “TruStory Experts Program” from “Experts @ TruStory” ###@trustory.io to Preethi Kasireddy ###@trustory.io (removed the info before @ as not sure if it would be ok to publish that info), date: Mon, 5 Nov 2018 10:34:09 -0800

Evidence: Authentication-Results: dkim=pass, header.i=@trustory.io
DKIM-Signature: v=1; a=rsa-sha256; c=relaxed/relaxed; d=trustory.io; s=google; h=mime-version:from:date:message-id:subject:to:cc; bh=Q+Hk7t7dGrERLMGrOgYiPmtuC+ceTcj28dhdMLl2oTU=; (…)
(a good question here: in case of the email headers used as an evidence, with all the DKIM headers etc, that text might get too long; so by posting it one would distract too much attention from a brief claim; but on the other hand not posting it fully the ‘evidence’ is not really an evidence, is it?)


#3

Here is how I would correct it.

Claim: 1. TruStory claims to value ethical, curious and passionate people who are motivated by crypto and blockchain for intrinsic reasons, not price speculation

Claim 2: TruStory claims that they would rather not tolerate: *laziness, entitlement, assholery, etc.

Keep claims separate and in complete sentences.

For evidence, the TruStory app will allow you to add pictures. So you could screenshot wherein the email it was written. Regarding the evidence being so long that it would take away attention from the claim, that won’t be a problem because of the UI of the app. Great question by the way.


#4

Great, thank you for these clarifications!

  1. Yep I see about the separate claims, and maybe even subclaims (as one could - by accident or not - add an extra word into the qualities list for example; OR on contrary omit a word)

  2. Attaching the pictures is great but yes it’s even better if there will be a separate text (long text!) field for the evidence like digital signatures, because probably not so many people would bother to recover these from images (if it was posted as a screenshot of the letter’s headers) to verify the signatures - and the picture itself could easily be doctored


#5

Personally speaking, anybody who is talking about mooning lamborghinis and shilling coins or projects would be disrespectful to the community and violate the terms of service.


#6

I believe it’s in the best interest of the community if all members are held to certain, basic standards/expectations:

-Folks should be tolerant of different/opposing views/philosophies

-Folks should be courteous and should practice constructive criticism

-Folks need to value their contribution, otherwise they are wasting everyone’s time. (If you’re passionate about what you’re saying, you’ll value your contribution.)

-Brevity is always appreciated. Easier said than done, but all should strive towards keeping their responses short and to the point.


#8

I wouldn’t really expect much from the community per se. People’s motivations never change really and they follow similar patterns on most if not all social media platforms I ever came across.

It’s the platform management who determines what the community will be like. It’s always a management issue before it grows as a community issue. The majority of the community will always go with the flow, and its the management responsibility to set the direction of that flow along the way.

So it depends on the management agility in addressing these issues.